Traveling Exhibit
June 20 – July 31
Port Angeles Main Library

NOLS has been selected in a competitive application process to host Native Voices: Native Peoples’ Concepts of Health and Illness, a traveling exhibition to U.S. libraries. This exhibit explores the interconnectedness of wellness, illness, and cultural life for Native Americans, Alaska Natives, and Native Hawaiians. Stories drawn from both the past and present examine how health for Native People is tied to community, the land, and spirit. Through interviews, Native People describe the impact of epidemics, federal legislation, the loss of land, and the inhibition of culture on the health of Native individuals and communities today.

Traveling ExhibitJune 20 – July 31
Port Angeles Main Library

NOLS has been selected in a competitive application process to host Native Voices: Native Peoples’ Concepts of Health and Illness, a traveling exhibition to U.S. libraries. This exhibit explores the interconnectedness of wellness, illness, and cultural life for Native Americans, Alaska Natives, and Native Hawaiians. Stories drawn from both the past and present examine how health for Native People is tied to community, the land, and spirit. Through interviews, Native People describe the impact of epidemics, federal legislation, the loss of land, and the inhibition of culture on the health of Native individuals and communities today.

Native Voices Program Series

Discovering the Stories Within Us

Discovering the Stories Within Us
Thursday, July 18 at 6:30pm
Port Angeles Main Library

Everyone has a story, or many stories! In this dynamic and inspiring session, Monique Gray Smith will share her personal story of recovery, including her journey of sobriety and how it led her to become a writer and storyteller. Monique will explain how she captures ideas, moments, and feelings and turns them into stories for both young and not-so-young readers. She will also read from her books and share how the stories were discovered and unfolded over time.

Discovering the Stories Within Us

Discovering the Stories Within Us
Thursday, July 18 at 6:30pm
Port Angeles Main Library

Everyone has a story, or many stories! In this dynamic and inspiring session, Monique Gray Smith will share her personal story of recovery, including her journey of sobriety and how it led her to become a writer and storyteller. Monique will explain how she captures ideas, moments, and feelings and turns them into stories for both young and not-so-young readers. She will also read from her books and share how the stories were discovered and unfolded over time.

More About Monique Gray Smith

Monique Gray SmithMonique Gray Smith is an award-winning, best-selling author of titles including Tilly: A Story of Hope and Resilience which won the 2014 Canadian Burt Award for First Nation, Métis and Inuit Literature, My Heart Fills with Happiness, which has won numerous awards, and Tilly and the Crazy Eights.

In September 2020, Monique will release When We Are Kind with Orca Book Publishers. Monique is Cree, Lakota, and Scottish and has been sober and involved in her healing journey for over 28 years. She is well known for her storytelling, spirit of generosity and focus on resilience.

Past Events

Medicinal Plants Events

Medicinal Plants
Tuesday, June 25 at 6pm
Port Angeles Main Library

Indigenous plants were once the only form of medicine to our Native ancestors. Jamestown S’Klallam Tribal Elder Lana Kerr will give an interactive presentation on common medicinal plants that grow practically in our own backyards. Lana will discuss the when, where, and what of Native plants and how to turn them into medicine and nutrition.

Medicinal Plants Events

Medicinal Plants
Tuesday, June 25 at 6pm
Port Angeles Main Library

Indigenous plants were once the only form of medicine to our Native ancestors. Jamestown S’Klallam Tribal Elder Lana Kerr will give an interactive presentation on common medicinal plants that grow practically in our own backyards. Lana will discuss the when, where, and what of Native plants and how to turn them into medicine and nutrition.

“My fascination with plants and flowers has exposed me to the vast medicinal value of local plants that most of us have struggled to remove from our gardens, thinking that they are weeds. Well, they are weeds that just happen to have been used in the diet and culture of our ancestors,” she said. Kerr will talk about this concept in greater detail during her presentation, and you will begin to see these plants in an entirely different way!

More about Lana Kerr

Lana KerrLana Kerr is a Jamestown S’Klallam Tribal Elder who began pursuing her passion for medicinal plants after retiring from the corporate world of Human Resources and Employee Assistance Programs, including Drug and Alcohol Counseling.

In 2012, she moved to (Kauai) Hawaii. While earning a Certificate in Horticulture from Oregon State University, she noticed that landscapers were trying to destroy beneficial Native plants in order to manage them. In 2014, she returned to Sequim, where she quickly became interested in preserving and using the Native plants indigenous to her homeland – on a small piece of property that has been in her family (the Prince family) for seven generations.

She continues to pursue her love of horticulture through the study, growth, care and cultivation of plants, flowers, trees and vegetables, and has employed research, training, education and collaboration with neighboring Indian Tribes to build a basic knowledge of the value of edible and medicinal local Native plants. Most recently, she earned a Professional Certificate in Cannabis Science and Medicine, to increase her understanding of the potential benefits of Cannabidiol (CBD) to human health.

hishuk’ish tsawalk
“Hishuk’ish Tsawalk” – Everything is One:
Revitalizing Northwest Coast Indigenous Food Systems

Friday, July 12 at 6:30pm
Port Angeles Main Library

Dr. Charlotte Coté will discuss how Northwest Coast Indigenous people are actively engaging decolonization and self-determination through the enactment of food sovereignty. Through food sovereignty strategies Indigenous people are restoring and reaffirming healthy and sustainable relationships with their homelands and placing ancestral ecological knowledge at the center of these decolonization efforts.

hishuk’ish tsawalk
“Hishuk’ish Tsawalk” – Everything is One:
Revitalizing Northwest Coast Indigenous Food Systems

Friday, July 12 at 6:30pm
Port Angeles Main Library

Dr. Charlotte Coté will discuss how Northwest Coast Indigenous people are actively engaging decolonization and self-determination through the enactment of food sovereignty. Through food sovereignty strategies Indigenous people are restoring and reaffirming healthy and sustainable relationships with their homelands and placing ancestral ecological knowledge at the center of these decolonization efforts.

More About Dr. Charlotte Coté

Dr. Charlotte CotéDr. Charlotte Coté is associate professor of American Indian Studies at the University of Washington. Dr. Coté holds a Ph.D. and M.A. in Comparative Ethnic Studies from the University of California at Berkeley, and a B.A. in Political Science from Simon Fraser University in B.C.. Dr. Coté is the author of Spirits of Our Whaling Ancestors: Revitalizing Makah and Nuu-chah-nulth Traditions (UW Press, 2010). Her other publications include, Indigenizing Food Sovereignty: Revitalizing Indigenous Food Practices and Ecological Knowledges in Canada and the U.S., and Food Sovereignty, Food Hegemony, and the Revitalization of Indigenous Whaling Practices. She is currently completing her next book that focuses on the revitalization of Indigenous food traditions and ancestral ecological knowledge. Dr. Coté serves as co-editor for the UW Press’ Indigenous Confluences series and co-hosts the UWTV’s Voices of the First People’s film series. Dr. Coté also serves as chair of the UW’s wǝɫǝbʔaltxʷ Intellectual House Advisory Committee and is Affiliated Faculty in the UW’s Jackson School of International Studies, Canadian Studies Center. She is the president of the Native-led nonprofit organization, Potlatch Fund. Dr. Coté is the founder and chair of the UW’s “The Living Breath of wǝɫǝbʔaltxʷ” Indigenous Foods and Ecological Knowledge Symposium.

Native Voices Traveling Exhibit

These programs are part of the Native Voices: Native Peoples’ Concepts of Health and Illness traveling exhibition on display at the Port Angeles Main Library from June 20 – July 31. Native Voices explores the interconnectedness of wellness, illness, and cultural life for Native Americans, Alaska Natives, and Native Hawaiians. Stories drawn from both the past and present examine how health for Native People is tied to community, the land, and spirit. Through interviews, Native People describe the impact of epidemics, federal legislation, the loss of land, and the inhibition of culture on the health of Native individuals and communities today.

The U.S. National Library of Medicine (NLM) developed and produced Native Voices: Native Peoples’ Concepts of Health and Illness. The American Library Association (ALA) Public Programs Office, in partnership with NLM, tours the exhibition to America’s libraries. As part of the exhibition award, NOLS received a $250 programming grant, virtual training, and publicity materials.

Native Voices Traveling Exhibit

These programs are part of the Native Voices: Native Peoples’ Concepts of Health and Illness traveling exhibition on display at the Port Angeles Main Library from June 20 – July 31. Native Voices explores the interconnectedness of wellness, illness, and cultural life for Native Americans, Alaska Natives, and Native Hawaiians. Stories drawn from both the past and present examine how health for Native People is tied to community, the land, and spirit. Through interviews, Native People describe the impact of epidemics, federal legislation, the loss of land, and the inhibition of culture on the health of Native individuals and communities today.

The U.S. National Library of Medicine (NLM) developed and produced Native Voices: Native Peoples’ Concepts of Health and Illness. The American Library Association (ALA) Public Programs Office, in partnership with NLM, tours the exhibition to America’s libraries. As part of the exhibition award, NOLS received a $250 programming grant, virtual training, and publicity materials.

Additional funding for this program is provided by the Port Angeles Friends of the Library. Support for the application of this exhibit came from the Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe, Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe, and Peninsula College House of Learning (Longhouse).

About the American Library Association

The American Library Association is the oldest and largest library association in the world, with approximately 55,000 members in academic, public, school, government and special libraries. The mission of the American Library Association is to provide leadership for the development, promotion and improvement of library and information services and the profession of librarianship in order to enhance learning and ensure access to information for all.

American Library Association

About the National Library of Medicine

The National Library of Medicine (NLM), on the campus of the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland, has been a center of information innovation since its founding in 1836. The world’s largest biomedical library, NLM maintains and makes available a vast print collection and produces electronic information resources on a wide range of topics that are searched billions of times each year by millions of people around the globe. It also supports and conducts research, development, and training in biomedical informatics and health information technology. In addition, the Library coordinates a 6,000-member National Network of Libraries of Medicine that promotes and provides access to health information in communities across the United States.

National Library of Medicine Logo
Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe
Jamestown S'klallam Tribe
Peninsula College
Native Voices Mother
Lower Elwha Klallam TribeJamestown S'klallam Tribe
Peninsula CollegeNative Voices Mother