The Second Saturday Book Discussion Group brings great fiction and nonfiction, classic and contemporary books to life, exploring those shared lives together.

Meet on Zoom on the second Saturday of the month at 3pm. Please note: In January 2023, this group will begin meeting in person at the Sequim Branch Library. All are welcome to join the conversation!

The upcoming book selections will be available for pick up any time after the current month’s discussion, during service hours at the Sequim Branch Library, on a first-come, first-served basis. Copies of the titles are also available in various formats through the catalog links below. Library staff and volunteers will moderate the discussion.

Book Groups Homepage
My Own Country by Abraham Verghese

Current Book Selection

December 10 at 3pm – Register here

My Own Country
by Abraham Verghese

Abraham Verghese, a young Indian doctor specializing in infectious diseases, was working in Johnson City, Tennessee when the local hospital treated its first AIDS patient. Dr. Verghese became by necessity the local AIDS expert, soon besieged by a shocking number of male and female patients whose stories came to occupy his mind, and even take over his life. Verghese brought a singular perspective to Johnson City: as a doctor unique in his abilities; as an outsider who could talk to people suspicious of local practitioners; above all, as a writer of grace and compassion who saw that what was happening in this conservative community was both a medical and a spiritual emergency.

Request a copy here

2023 Book Groups Schedule
2022 Book Discussion Schedule
The Storied Life of A.J. Fikry by Gabrielle Zevin

January 8 at 3pm – Register here
The The Storied Life of A.J. Fikry
by Gabrielle Zevin

When his most prized possession, a rare collection of Poe poems, is stolen, bookstore owner A. J. Fikry begins isolating himself from his friends, family, and associates before receiving a mysterious package that compels him to remake his life.

Request a copy here

Men Explain Things to Me by Rebecca Solnit

February 12 at 3pm – Register here
Men Explain Things to Me
by Rebecca Solnit

In this comic, scathing essay, Rebecca Solnit took on what often goes wrong in conversations between men and women. She wrote about men who wrongly assume they know things and wrongly assume women don’t, about why this arises, and how this aspect of the gender war works, airing some of her own hilariously awful encounters. She ends on a serious note: the ultimate problem is the silencing of women who have something to say, including those saying things like, “He’s trying to kill me!” This book features that now-classic essay with six complements, including an examination of feminist writer Virginia Woolf ‘s embrace of mystery, an original inquiry into marriage equality, and a survey of the scope of contemporary violence against women.

Request a copy here

Deacon King Kong by James McBride

March 12 at 3pm – Register here
Deacon King Kong
by James McBride

In September 1969, a fumbling, cranky old church deacon known as Sportcoat shuffles into the courtyard of the Cause Houses housing project in south Brooklyn, pulls a .38 from his pocket, and, in front of everybody, shoots the project’s drug dealer at point-blank range. As the story deepens, it becomes clear that the lives of the characters overlap in unexpected ways. When the truth does emerge, McBride shows us that not all secrets are meant to be hidden, that the best way to grow is to face change without fear, and that the seeds of love lie in hope and compassion.

Request a copy here

The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind by William Kamkwamba, Bryan Mealer

April 9 at 3pm – Register here
The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind
by William Kamkwamba, Bryan Mealer

William Kamkwamba was born in Malawi, a country where magic ruled and modern science was mystery. It was also a land withered by drought and hunger. But William had read about windmills, and he dreamed of building one that would bring to his small village a set of luxuries that only 2 percent of Malawians could enjoy: electricity and running water. His neighbors called him misala—crazy—but William refused to let go of his dreams. With a small pile of once-forgotten science textbooks; some scrap metal, tractor parts, and bicycle halves; and an armory of curiosity and determination, he embarked on a daring plan to forge an unlikely contraption and small miracle that would change the lives around him.

Request a copy here

Just Mercy by Bryan Stevenson

May 14 at 3pm – Register here
Just Mercy
by Bryan Stevenson

Bryan Stevenson was a gifted young attorney when he founded the Equal Justice Initiative, a legal practice dedicated to defending the poor, the wrongly condemned, and those trapped in the furthest reaches of our criminal justice system. One of his first cases was that of Walter McMillian, a young man sentenced to die for a notorious murder he didn’t commit. The case drew Stevenson into a tangle of conspiracy, political machination, and legal brinksmanship – and transformed his understanding of mercy and justice forever.

Request a copy here

The Beekeeper of Aleppo by Christy Lefteri

June 11 at 3pm – Register here
The Beekeeper of Aleppo 
by Christy Lefteri

Nuri is a beekeeper and Afra, his wife, is an artist. They live a simple life, rich in family and friends, in the hills of the beautiful Syrian city of Aleppo—until the unthinkable happens. When all they love is destroyed by war, Nuri knows they have no choice except to leave their home. But escaping Syria will be no easy task: Afra has lost her sight, leaving Nuri to navigate her grief as well as a perilous journey through Turkey and Greece toward an uncertain future in Britain. Nuri is sustained only by the knowledge that waiting for them is his cousin Mustafa, who has started an apiary in Yorkshire and is teaching fellow refugees beekeeping.

Request a copy here

Having and Being Had by Eula Biss

July 9 at 3pm – Register here
Having and Being Had
by Eula Biss

“My adult life can be divided into two distinct parts,” Eula Biss writes, “the time before I owned a washing machine and the time after.” Having just purchased her first home, the poet and essayist now embarks on a provocative exploration of the value system she has bought into. Through a series of engaging exchanges—in libraries and laundromats, over barstools and backyard fences—she examines our assumptions about class and property and the ways we internalize the demands of capitalism.

Request a copy here

Anxious People by Fredrik Backman

August 13 at 3pm – Register here
Anxious People
by Fredrik Backman

Real estate isn’t usually a life-or-death situation, but an apartment open house becomes just that when a failed bank robber bursts in and takes a group of strangers hostage. The captives include a retired couple who hunt down fixer-uppers to avoid why they can’t fix their marriage; a wealthy bank director who is too busy to care about anyone else; a young couple who are about to have their first child; an eighty-year-old woman who is not afraid of someone waving a gun; a flustered but still-ready-to-make-a-deal real estate agent; and a mystery man who has locked himself in the bathroom. Altogether the worst group of hostages in the world.

Request a copy here

Dinner with Edward by Isabel Vincent

September 10 at 3pm – Register Here
Dinner with Edward
by Isabel Vincent

Isabel Vincent first arrives at Edward’s New York apartment to check on him as a favor to his daughter. She has no idea that the nonagenarian baking a sublime roast chicken and a light-as-air apricot soufflé will end up changing her life. But their meeting comes at a moment of transition for each of them: Edward wants nothing more than to follow his late wife to the grave, while Isabel is watching her marriage unravel.  As Edward and Isabel meet weekly for the glorious dinners that Edward prepares, he shares so much more than his recipes for apple galette or the perfect martini, or even his tips for deboning poultry. Edward teaches Isabel the art of slowing down, taking the time to think through her own life—cutting it back to the bone and examining the guts, no matter how messy that proves to be.

Request a copy here

One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel García Márquez

October 8 at 3pm – Register Here
One Hundred Years of Solitude
by Gabriel García Márquez

This novel tells the story of the rise and fall of the mythical town of Macondo through the history of the Buendía family. Rich and brilliant, it is a chronicle of life, death, and the tragicomedy of humankind. In the beautiful, ridiculous, and tawdry story of the Buendía family, one sees all of humanity, just as in the history, myths, growth, and decay of Macondo, one sees all of Latin America.

Request a copy here

The Plague of Doves by Louise Erdrich

November 12 at 3pm – Register Here
The Plague of Doves
by Louise Erdrich

Though generations have passed, the town of Pluto continues to be haunted by the murder of a farm family. Evelina Harp—part Ojibwe, part white—is an ambitious young girl whose grandfather, a repository of family and tribal history, harbors knowledge of the violent past. Judge Antone Bazil Coutts, who bears witness, understands the weight of historical injustice better than anyone. Through the distinct and winning voices of three unforgettable narrators, the collective stories of two interwoven communities ultimately come together to reveal a final wrenching truth.

Request a copy here

My Own Country by Abraham Verghese

December 10 at 3pm – Register Here
My Own Country
by Abraham Verghese

Abraham Verghese, a young Indian doctor specializing in infectious diseases, was working in Johnson City, Tennessee when the local hospital treated its first AIDS patient. Dr. Verghese became by necessity the local AIDS expert, soon besieged by a shocking number of male and female patients whose stories came to occupy his mind, and even take over his life. Verghese brought a singular perspective to Johnson City: as a doctor unique in his abilities; as an outsider who could talk to people suspicious of local practitioners; above all, as a writer of grace and compassion who saw that what was happening in this conservative community was both a medical and a spiritual emergency.

Request a copy here

NOLS Book Discussion Groups are generously supported by a donation made in memory of Sally Albiso, and local Friends of the Library groups.