The Second Saturday Book Discussion Group brings great fiction and nonfiction, classic and contemporary books to life, exploring those shared lives together. Join the Second Saturday Book Discussion Group every second Saturday of the month at 3pm on Zoom. All are welcome to join the conversation!

The upcoming book selections will be available for pick up any time after the current month’s discussion, during service hours at the Sequim Branch Library, on a first-come, first-served basis. Copies of the titles are also available in various formats through the catalog links below.

Library staff and volunteers will moderate the discussion. Sign in via Zoom web link to see other participants, or call in to join the meeting; no internet required to connect by phone. Registration is required to receive Zoom login.

Book Groups Homepage
Registration is required.
The Memory Police

Current Book Selection

Saturday, June 12 at 3pm
Zoom Meeting – Register Here

The Memory Police
by Yoko Ogawa

On an unnamed island, objects are disappearing: first hats, then ribbons, birds…roses. Most of the inhabitants are oblivious to these changes, while those few able to recall the lost objects live in fear of the draconian Memory Police, who are committed to ensuring that what has disappeared remains forgotten. When a young writer discovers that her editor is in danger, she concocts a plan to hide him beneath her floorboards, and together they cling to her writing as the last way of preserving the past.

Request a copy here

2nd Saturday 2021 Book Selection List
The Sympathizer

January 9 at 3pm – Register here
The Sympathizer
by Viet Thanh Nguyen

This Pulitzer Prize winning novel follows a Viet Cong agent as he spies on a South Vietnamese army general and his compatriots as they start a new life in 1975 Los Angeles.

Request a copy here

Harry’s Trees

February 13 at 3pm – Register here
Harry’s Trees
by Jon Cohen

Thirty-four-year-old Harry Crane works as an analyst for the US Forest Service. When his wife dies suddenly, he is unable to cope. Leaving his job and his old life behind, Harry makes his way to the remote woods of northeastern Pennsylvania’s Endless Mountains– determined to lose himself. But fate intervenes in the form of a fiercely determined young girl named Oriana. She and her mother, Amanda, are struggling to pick up the pieces from their own tragedy– Amanda stoically holding it together while Oriana roams the forest searching for answers. And in Oriana’s magical, willful mind, she believes that Harry is the key to righting her world.

Request a copy here

Maid: Hard Work, Low Pay

March 13 at 3pm – Register here
Maid: Hard Work, Low Pay, and a Mother’s Will to Survive
by Stephanie Land

While the gap between upper middle-class Americans and the working poor widens, grueling low-wage domestic and service work–primarily done by women–fuels the economic success of the wealthy. Stephanie Land worked for years as a maid, pulling long hours while struggling as a single mom to keep a roof over her daughter’s head. In Maid, she reveals the dark truth of what it takes to survive and thrive in today’s inequitable society.

Request a copy here

The Fifth Season

April 10 at 3pm – Register here
The Fifth Season
by N.K. Jemisin

This is the way the world ends… for the last time. It starts with the great red rift across the heart of the world’s sole continent, spewing ash that blots out the sun. It starts with death, with a murdered son and a missing daughter. It starts with betrayal, and long dormant wounds rising up to fester. This is the Stillness, a land long familiar with catastrophe, where the power of the earth is wielded as a weapon. And where there is no mercy.

Request a copy here

The Other Americans

May 8 at 3pm – Register here
The Other Americans
by Laila Lalami

Late one spring night, Driss Guerraoui, a Moroccan immigrant in California, is walking across a darkened intersection when he is killed by a speeding car. The repercussions of his death bring together a diverse cast of characters: Guerraoui’s daughter Nora, a jazz composer who returns to the small town in the Mojave she thought she’d left for good; his widow Maryam, who still pines after her life in the old country; Efrain, an undocumented witness whose fear of deportation prevents him from coming forward; Jeremy, a former classmate of Nora’s and a veteran of the Iraq war; Coleman, a detective who is slowly discovering her son’s secrets; Anderson, a neighbor trying to reconnect with his family; and the murdered man himself. As the characters tell their stories, the invisible connections that tie them together–even while they remain deeply divided by race, religion, or class are slowly revealed.

Request a copy here

The Memory Police

June 12 at 3pm – Register here
The Memory Police
by Yoko Ogawa

On an unnamed island, objects are disappearing: first hats, then ribbons, birds…roses. Most of the inhabitants are oblivious to these changes, while those few able to recall the lost objects live in fear of the draconian Memory Police, who are committed to ensuring that what has disappeared remains forgotten. When a young writer discovers that her editor is in danger, she concocts a plan to hide him beneath her floorboards, and together they cling to her writing as the last way of preserving the past.

Request a copy here

There There

July 10 at 3pm – Register here
There There
by Tommy Orange

A multi-generational, relentlessly paced story about violence and recovery, hope and loss, identity and power, dislocation and communion, and the beauty and despair woven into the history of a nation and its people.

Request a copy here

Braiding Sweetgrass

August 14 at 3pm – Register here
Braiding Sweetgrass
by Robin Wall Kimmerer

Drawing on her life as an indigenous scientist, a mother, and a woman, Kimmerer shows how other living beings—asters and goldenrod, strawberries and squash, salamanders, algae, and sweetgrass—offer us gifts and lessons, even if we’ve forgotten how to hear their voices. In a rich braid of reflections that range from the creation of Turtle Island to the forces that threaten its flourishing today, she circles toward a central argument: that the awakening of a wider ecological consciousness requires the acknowledgment and celebration of our reciprocal relationship with the rest of the living world. For only when we can hear the languages of other beings will we be capable of understanding the generosity of the earth, and learn to give our own gifts in return.

Request a copy here

H is for Hawk

September 11 at 3pm – Register Here
H is for Hawk
by Helen Macdonald

When Helen Macdonald’s father died suddenly on a London street, she was devastated. An experienced falconer—Helen had been captivated by hawks since childhood—she’d never before been tempted to train one of the most vicious predators, the goshawk. But in her grief, she saw that the goshawk’s fierce and feral temperament mirrored her own. Resolving to purchase and raise the deadly creature as a means to cope with her loss, she adopted Mabel. Projecting herself “in the hawk’s wild mind to tame her” tested the limits of Macdonald’s humanity and changed her life.

Request a copy here

Hunger

October 9 at 3pm – Register Here
Hunger
by Roxane Gay

In this intimate and searing memoir, the New York Times bestselling author Roxane Gay addresses the experience of living in a body that she calls “wildly undisciplined.” She casts an insightful and critical eye over her childhood, teens, and twenties—including the devastating act of violence that was a turning point in her young life—and brings readers into the present and the realities, pains, and joys of her daily life. Hunger is a deeply personal memoir from one of our finest writers, and it tells a story that hasn’t yet been told but needs to be.

Request a copy here

So You Want to Talk About Race

November 13 at 3pm – Register Here
So You Want to Talk About Race
by Ijeoma Oluo

Widespread reporting on aspects of white supremacy — from police brutality to the mass incarceration of Black Americans — has put a media spotlight on racism in our society. Still, it is a difficult subject to talk about. How do you tell your roommate her jokes are racist? Why did your sister-in-law take umbrage when you asked to touch her hair — and how do you make it right? How do you explain white privilege to your white, privileged friend? Ijeoma Oluo guides readers of all races through subjects ranging from intersectionality and affirmative action to “model minorities” in an attempt to make the seemingly impossible possible: honest conversations about race and racism, and how they infect almost every aspect of American life.

Request a copy here

Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine

December 11 at 3pm – Register Here
Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine
by Gail Honeyman

Meet Eleanor Oliphant. She struggles with appropriate social skills and tends to say exactly what she’s thinking. Nothing is missing in her carefully timetabled life of avoiding social interactions, where weekends are punctuated by frozen pizza, vodka, and phone chats with Mummy. But everything changes when Eleanor meets Raymond. When she and Raymond together save Sammy, an elderly gentleman who has fallen on the sidewalk, the three become the kinds of friends who rescue one another from the lives of isolation they have each been living.

Request a copy here

NOLS Book Discussion Groups are generously supported by a donation made in memory of Sally Albiso, and local Friends of the Library groups.