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Port Angeles Library Events

All branches will be closed for an all-day staff training session on Friday, April 25, 2014. All branches will reopen on Saturday, April 26 at 10 a.m.

Poetry Walks

Three self guided trails connecting poetry and nature. April 19 – May 31. More information here.




April PALS Book Discussion Group

Stag's Leap

Stag's Leap by Sharon Olds
Wednesday, April 30, 6:30pm


Celebrate national poetry month with PALS and the poetry of Pulitzer Prize winning poet Sharon Olds. Stag’s Leap is stunningly poignant sequence of poems that tells the story of a divorce, embracing strands of love, sex, sorrow, memory, and new freedom. Her unsparing approach to both pain and love makes this one of Old’s finest, most powerful books of poetry.

Copies of the book are available at the library as well as downloadable ebook format.
Request a copy here.

Pre-registration is not required for this program. Drop-ins are always welcome.




PALS Book Discussion Group 2014 Book Selections

A monthly book discussion group reading both fiction and nonfiction, meeting at 6:30pm on the last Wednesday of every month (except December 17, 2014). Attend as often as you wish. Drop- ins welcome.

  • Book Selection List

  • Where'd You Go Bernadette

    January 29, 2014

    Where'd You Go Bernadette
    by Maria Semple
    Bernadette Fox is notorious; to her Microsoft-guru husband, she's a fearlessly opinionated partner; to fellow private-school mothers in Seattle, she's a disgrace; to design mavens, she's a revolutionary architect; and to 15-year-old Bee, she is a best friend and, simply, Mom. Then she disappears. This wickedly funny novel skewers Seattle and the yuppie life while at the same time celebrating the bonds of family and the love between a mother and daughter.

    Request this item.


    People of the Book

    February 24, 2014

    People of the Book
    by Geraldine Brooks
    Inspired by a true story, People of the Book is a novel of sweeping historical grandeur and intimate emotional intensity, written by an acclaimed and beloved author. Called "a tour de force" by the San Francisco Chronicle, this ambitious, electrifying work traces the harrowing journey of the famed Sarajevo Haggadah, a beautifully illuminated Hebrew manuscript created in fifteenth-century Spain to its presence in war torn Bosnia.

    Request this item.


    The White Tiger

    March 26, 2014

    The White Tiger
    by Aravind Adiga
    The white tiger of this novel is Balram Halwai, a poor Indian villager whose great ambition leads him to the zenith of Indian business culture, the world of the Bangalore entrepreneur. On the occasion of the president of China’s impending trip to Bangalore, Balram writes a letter to him describing his transformation. Amoral, irreverent, deeply endearing, and utterly contemporary, this novel is an international publishing sensation—and a startling, provocative debut.

    Request this item.


    Stag's Leap

    April 30, 2014

    Stag's Leap
    by Sharon Olds
    Celebrate national poetry month with PALS and the poetry of Pulitzer Prize winning poet Sharon Olds. Stag’s Leap is stunningly poignant sequence of poems that tells the story of a divorce, embracing strands of love, sex, sorrow, memory, and new freedom. Her unsparing approach to both pain and love makes this one of Old’s finest, most powerful books of poetry.

    Request this item.


    Nothing To Envy

    May 28, 2014

    Nothing To Envy: Ordinary Lives in North Korea
    by Barbara Demick
    Award-winning journalist Barbara Demick follows the lives of six North Korean citizens over fifteen years—a chaotic period that saw the death of Kim Il-sung, the rise to power of his son Kim Jong-il, and a devastating famine that killed one-fifth of the population. Demick brings to life what it means to be living under the most repressive totalitarian regime today.

    Request this item.


    Bring Your Own Book Party

    June 25, 2014

    Bring Your Own Book Party
    Participants are invited to bring one or two of the best books they have read in 2013 – 2014 to share with the group. Everyone will come away with a list of great recommendations of books to read. There will also be an optional book swap – bring a gently used book to trade. For more information contact librarian Lorrie Corder at .


    Five Days At Memorial: Life and Death in a Storm Ravaged Hospital

    July 30, 2014

    Five Days At memorial: Life and Death in a Storm Ravaged Hospital
    by Sheri Fink
    In the tradition of the best investigative journalism, physician and reporter Sheri Fink reconstructs 5 days at Memorial Medical Center, a New Orleans hospital ravaged by Hurricane Katrina, and draws the reader into the lives of those who struggled mightily to survive and to maintain life amid chaos. A remarkable book, engrossing from start to finish, Five Days at Memorial radically transforms the reader’s understanding of human nature in crisis.

    Request this item.


    Hearts of Horses

    August 28, 2014

    Hearts of Horses
    by Molly Gloss
    In the winter of 1917, nineteen-year-old Martha Lessen saddles her horses and heads for a remote county in eastern Oregon, looking for work “gentling” wild horses. She chances on a rancher, George Bliss, who is willing to hire her on. Many of his regular hands are off fighting the war, and he glimpses, beneath her showy rodeo garb, a shy but strong-willed girl with a serious knowledge of horses. So begins the irresistible tale of a young but determined woman trying to make a go of it in a man’s world.

    Request this item.


    The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind: Creating Currents of electricity and Hope

    September 24, 2014

    The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind: Creating Currents of electricity and Hope
    by William Kamkwambe
    William Kamkwamba was born in Malawi, a land withered by drought and hunger. But William had read about windmills, and he dreamed of building one that would bring luxuries to his small village that only 2 percent of Malawians could enjoy: electricity and running water. With a small pile of once-forgotten science textbooks, some scrap metal, tractor parts, and bicycle halves -- and an armory of curiosity and determination, he embarked on a daring plan to forge an unlikely contraption, and created a small miracle that changed the lives around him. A remarkable true story.

    Request this item.


    1984

    October 29, 2014

    1984
    by George Orwell
    PALS continues its tradition of reading a classic in October. Written in 1948, 1984 was George Orwell’s chilling prophecy about the future. And while 1984 has come and gone, Orwell’s narrative is timelier than ever. 1984 presents a startling and haunting vision of the world, so powerful that it is completely convincing from start to finish.

    Request this item.


    Short Nights of the Shadow Catcher

    November 26, 2014

    Short Nights of the Shadow Catcher: The Epic Life and Immortal Photographs of Edward Curtis
    by Timothy Egan
    In the summer of 1900, Edward Curtis gave up a successful photography career in Seattle to pursue a quixotic plan: to photograph all the Indian communities in North America. He realized he had to move quickly “to capture the essence of their lives before that essence disappeared.” A mountaineer, explorer, intrepid photojournalist, and amateur anthropologist, Curtis became a willful and passionate chronicler. “I want to make them live forever,” Curtis said in the early days of his decades-long mission. As Egan’s thrilling story attests, he succeeded.

    Request this item.


    Trickster: Native American Tales

    December 17, 2014

    Trickster: Native American Tales
    by Matt Dembicki
    A follow up to November’s nonfiction selection , Trickster collects traditional stories written and illustrated by contemporary Native American artists in a graphic novel anthology. Readers will find a wide variety of trickster tales and experience a wide variety of illustration styles in this ground breaking graphic novel.

    Request this item.



May 2nd Tuesday Book Discussion Group

Where'd You Go Bernadette

Where'd You Go Bernadette by Maria Semple
Tuesday, May 13, 11am

Bernadette Fox is notorious; to her Microsoft-guru husband, she's a fearlessly opinionated partner; to fellow private-school mothers in Seattle, she's a disgrace; to design mavens, she's a revolutionary architect; and to 15-year-old Bee, she is a best friend and, simply, Mom. Then she disappears. This wickedly funny novel skewers Seattle and the yuppie life while at the same time celebrating the bonds of family and the love between a mother and daughter.

Copies of the book are available at the library as well as large print, book on CD, and downloadable audiobook format.
Request a copy here.



2nd Tuesday Book Discussion Group 2014 Book Selections

A monthly book discussion group reading both fiction and nonfiction, meeting at 11am on the second Tuesday of every month. Attend as often as you wish.
Drop- ins welcome.

  • Book Selection List

  • The Book Thief

    January 14, 2014

    The Book Thief
    by Markus Zusak
    Trying to make sense of the horrors of World War II, Death relates the story of Liesel--a young German girl whose book-stealing and story-telling talents help sustain her family and the Jewish man they are hiding, as well as their neighbors.

    Request this item.



    The Headmaster's Wager

    February 11, 2014

    The Headmaster's Wager
    by Vincent Lam
    Enjoying his position as the headmaster of Saigon's best English school while indulging in a gambling and womanizing lifestyle, Percival Chen becomes aware of the local violence when his son lands in trouble with the authorities.

    Request this item.



    An Ocean Between Us

    March 11, 2014

    An Ocean Between Us
    by Evelyn Iritani
    An exploration of the evolving relationship between Japan and the United States focuses on four true stories from Port Angeles, Washington, beginning in 1834 with shipwrecked Japanese sailors in Washington and ending with American workers employed by a Japanese corporation.

    Request this item.


    Plume: Poems

    April 8, 2014

    Plume: Poems
    by Kathleen Flenniken
    The poems in Plume are nuclear-age songs of innocence and experience set in the "empty" desert West. Award-winning poet Kathleen Flenniken grew up in Richland, Washington, at the height of the Cold War, next door to the Hanford Nuclear Reservation, where "every father I knew disappeared to fuel the bomb," and worked at Hanford herself as a civil engineer and hydrologist. The book's personal story and its historical one converge with enriching interplay and wide technical variety, introducing characters that range from Carolyn and her father to Italian physicist Enrico Fermi and Manhattan Project health physicist Herbert Parker. As a child of "Atomic City," Kathleen Flenniken brings to this tragedy the knowing perspective of an insider coupled with the art of a precise, unflinching, gifted poet.

    Request this item.


    Where'd You Go Bernadette

    May 13, 2014

    Where'd You Go Bernadette
    by Maria Semple
    Bernadette Fox is notorious; to her Microsoft-guru husband, she's a fearlessly opinionated partner; to fellow private-school mothers in Seattle, she's a disgrace; to design mavens, she's a revolutionary architect; and to 15-year-old Bee, she is a best friend and, simply, Mom. Then she disappears. This wickedly funny novel skewers Seattle and the yuppie life while at the same time celebrating the bonds of family and the love between a mother and daughter.

    Request this item.


    The Crossing Places

    June 10, 2014

    The Crossing Places
    by Elly Griffiths
    When a child's bones are found near an ancient henge in the wild saltmarshes of Norfolk's north coast, Ruth Galloway, a university lecturer in forensic archaeology, is asked to date them by DCI Harry Nelson who thinks they may be the bones of a child called Lucy who has been missing for ten years.

    Request this item.


    The Penguin Book of International Women's Stories

    July 8, 2014

    The Penguin Book of International Women's Stories
    edited by Kate Figes
    A collection of thirty-three short stories from around the world celebrates the diversity of women's experiences and includes selections from both famous and lesser-known female authors.

    Request this item.



    The Boys In the Boat

    August 12, 2014

    The Boys In the Boat
    by Daniel Brown
    This book tells the story of the University of Washington's 1936 eight-oar crew and their epic quest for an Olympic gold medal, a team that transformed the sport and grabbed the attention of millions of Americans. It traces the story of the team that defeated elite rivals at Hitler's 1936 Berlin Olympics, sharing the experiences of their enigmatic coach, a visionary boat builder, and a homeless teen rower. One of the rowers hailed from Sequim, Washington.

    Request this item.


    Septembers of Shiraz

    September 9, 2014

    Septembers of Shiraz
    by Dalia Sofer
    In the aftermath of the Iranian revolution, rare-gem dealer Isaac Amin is arrested, wrongly accused of being a spy. Terrified by his disappearance, his family must reconcile a new world of cruelty and chaos with the collapse of everything they have known.

    Request this item.



    Delta Wedding

    October 14, 2014

    Delta Wedding
    by Wudora Welty
    2nd Tuesday discusses a classic story from the literature of the American South. Welty presents a vivid and charming portrait of a large southern family, the Fairchilds, who live on a plantation in the Mississippi delta. The story, set in 1923, is exquisitely woven from the ordinary events of family life, centered around the visit of a young relative, Laura McRaven, and the family’s preparations for her cousin Dabney’s wedding.

    Request this item.


    The Help

    November 11, 2014

    The Help
    by Kathryn Stockett
    In 1960s Mississippi, Skeeter, a southern society girl, returns from college determined to become a writer, but turns her friends' lives, and a small Mississippi town, upside down when she decides to interview the black women who have spent their lives taking care of prominent southern families. This book will provide a counter point to the previous month’s book Delta Wedding which completely ignores the lives of the African American people living in the cities and plantations of the American South.

    Request this item.


    The Night Circus

    December 9, 2014

    The Night Circus
    by Erin Morgenstern
    The circus arrives without warning. No announcements precede it. It is simply there, when yesterday it was not. Within the black-and-white striped canvas tents is an utterly unique experience full of breathtaking amazements. It is called Le Cirque des RĂªves, and it is only open at night. But behind the scenes, a fierce competition is underway—a duel between two young magicians, Celia and Marco, who have been trained since childhood expressly for this purpose by their mercurial instructors.

    Request this item.



May Man Up Book Discussion Group

Fires: Essays, Poems, Stories

Fires: Essays, Poems, Stories by Raymond Carver
Friday, May 23, 5pm

In this slim volume, the reader is treated to essays and poems, and Carver's trademark: taut short stories. In remarkably few words, Carver paints a vivid tableau of American life. Carver's work focuses on subjects that other writers shy away from: working-class stiffs and the mundane lives they lead. But Carver's magic lies in his ability to fascinate the reader with seemingly ordinary topics.

Copies of the book are available at the library.
Request a copy here.




Man Up 2014 Book Selections

Man Up is a book discussion program open to all but designed with male readers in mind. Reading the working man’s experience on the frontiers of land, family, labor, and discovery, selections will feature authors and settings primarily in the Pacific Northwest. It is free and open to the public. No reservations are needed. Attend as often as you wish. Discussions take place the fourth Friday of each month at 5:00 pm. No Man Up discussion wil be held in April.

  • Book Selection List


  • Angle of Repose

    January 24, 2014

    Angle of Repose
    by Wallace Stegner
    Wallace Stegner's Pulitzer Prize-winning novel is a story of discovery - personal, historical, and geographical. Confined to a wheelchair, retired historian Lyman Ward sets out to write his grandparents' remarkable story, chronicling their days spent carving civilization into the surface of America's western frontier. But his research reveals even more about his own life than he's willing to admit. What emerges is an enthralling portrait of four generations in the life of an American family.

    Request this item.


    The Whistling Season

    February 28, 2014

    The Whistling Season
    by Ivan Doig
    Like many of Doig's earlier novels, The Whistling Season is set in rural eastern Montana in the past. It reveals that time and place in distinct, uncluttered prose that carries the full enthusiasm of affection and even love—for the landscape, the characters, and the events of the story—without being sentimental.

    Request this item.


    Sometimes A Great Notion

    March 28, 2014

    Sometimes A Great Notion
    by Ken Kesey
    The magnificent second novel from the legendary author of One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest is a wild-spirited and hugely powerful tale of an Oregon logging clan. A bitter strike is raging in a small lumber town along the Oregon coast. Bucking that strike out of sheer cussedness is the Stamper family. Out of the Stamper family's rivalries and betrayals Ken Kesey has crafted a novel with the mythic impact of Greek tragedy.

    Request this item.


    Fires: Essays, Poems, Stories

    May 23, 2014

    Fires: Essays, Poems, Stories
    by Raymond Carver
    In this slim volume, the reader is treated to essays and poems, and Carver's trademark: taut short stories. In remarkably few words, Carver paints a vivid tableau of American life. Carver's work focuses on subjects that other writers shy away from: working-class stiffs and the mundane lives they lead. But Carver's magic lies in his ability to fascinate the reader with seemingly ordinary topics.

    Request this item.


    June to December selections to be announced.



Art in the Library at the Port Angeles Main Library

Robert Simpson's Clestial Body

The spring Art in the Library exhibit features the works of local artists Cindy Elstrom, Jack Galloway, Pam Russell, John Teichert and Port Angeles High School students Bailey Beckett and Bob Simpson. The exhibit will be on display at the Library from April 10 through July 8.

Art in the Library is a collaborative library/community art project featuring rotating exhibits by local artists. The program has been made possible by generous contributions from the Port Angeles Friends of the Library, and also by the efforts of volunteer art coordinator Diane Williams, who schedules the artists and designs the displays. More information about Art in the Library can be found here.




NOLS Partners with the Port Angeles Symphony Orchestra

Are you eagerly anticipating the 2013-2014 Port Angeles Symphony season? Can’t wait for opening night? The North Olympic Library System, in partnership with the Port Angeles Symphony, will once again make the Symphony’s selected pieces for the season available for home listening.

Recordings personally selected by Port Angeles Symphony conductor Adam Stern have been added to the library CD collection. Highlights include: Symphony No. 1 ‘Winter Daydreams’ by Tchaikovsky performed by the Seattle Symphony conducted by Gerard Schwarz, Concerto for Piano and Orchestra No. 5 in F minor, BWV 1053 by Bach performed by Glenn Gould, and the Rapsody-Concerto for Viola and Orchestra composedby Bohuslav Martinu. To locate these and other discs in the library catalog perform a simple key word search using the phrase: Symphony Selection. A list will display with both the current season’s offerings as well as those from 2012. Customers may use the catalog in any branch or from home by visiting the library’s webpage at www.nols.org.

In its second year, this great partnership continues to benefit musicians and audience members as well as general music lovers in Clallam County.

Please note that two of the Symphony’s selections were not available on CD. Bach’s Chaconne in d to be played at the February concert, has yet to be recorded with full orchestration. However a stunning recording of the original version for violin is available on disc 2 track 5 of the CD entitled Sonatas and Partitas featuring Nathan Milstein on violin. Composer Gail Kubik’s piece Bachata selected for the April concert is also not available. Concert goers may enjoy Kubik’s playful Gerald McBoing Boing instead on the CD Gerald McBoing Boing and Other Heroes conducted by Adam Stern.

Symphony with Logo

NOLS and PUD partner to help you save energy

Watt DetectorClallam County PUD
Kill-a-Watt™ Energy Detector Toolkits are available for checkout. Click here for more information about this program.