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PALS Book Discussion Group @ Port Angeles Main Library

PALS Book Discussion Group

The Port Angeles Literary Society (PALS) reads both fiction and nonfiction titles. The group meets at
6:30pm on the last Wednesday of every month in the Coffey Room at the Port Angeles Main Library.

Attend as often as you wish. Drop- ins are always welcome. Copies of each month's selection may be available for check out on a first-come first-served basis.

The PALS book discussion group is generously supported by the Port Angeles Friends of the Library.

Current Book Selection

The Witches – Salem, 1692

The Witches – Salem, 1692 by Stacy Schiff
Wednesday, March 29, 6:30pm

An electrifying, fresh view of the Salem witch trials by the author of Cleopatra. Drawing masterfully from the archives, Stacy Schiff illuminates the demands of a rigorous faith and the vulnerability of settlements adrift from the mother country. The textures and tensions of a colonial life emerge with devastating clarity. Schiff brings early American anxieties to the fore to align them brilliantly with our own. In an era of religious provocations, crowdsourcing, and invisible enemies, this enthralling story makes more sense than ever.

Copies of the book are available. Request a copy here.

  • PALS Book Selection List
  • In The Heart of the Sea

    January 25, 2017

    In The Heart of the Sea
    by Nathaniel Philbrick
    The incredible story of the wreck of the whaleship Essex, the inspiration for Melville’s great classic, Moby Dick. In 1820, the Essex set sail from Nantucket on a routine voyage for whales. Fifteen months later, in the farthest reaches of the South Pacific, it was rammed and sunk by an eighty–ton bull sperm whale. Its twenty–man crew, fearing cannibals on the islands to the west, made for the 3,000–mile–distant coast of South America in three tiny boats.

    Request this item.

    The Toss of A Lemon

    February 22, 2017

    The Toss of A Lemon
    by Padma Viswanathan
    Married at ten, widowed at eighteen, left with two children, Sivakami must wear widow’s whites, shave her head, and touch no one from dawn to dusk. She is not allowed to remarry, and in the next sixty years she ventures outside her family compound only three times. She is extremely orthodox in her behavior except for one defiant act: She moves back to her dead husband’s house and village to raise her children. That decision sets the course of her children’s and grandchildren’s lives, twisting their fates in surprising, sometimes heartbreaking ways.

    Request this item.

    The Witches – Salem, 1692

    March 29, 2017

    The Witches – Salem, 1692
    by Stacy Schiff
    An electrifying, fresh view of the Salem witch trials by the author of Cleopatra. Drawing masterfully from the archives, Stacy Schiff illuminates the demands of a rigorous faith and the vulnerability of settlements adrift from the mother country. The textures and tensions of a colonial life emerge with devastating clarity. Schiff brings early American anxieties to the fore to align them brilliantly with our own. In an era of religious provocations, crowdsourcing, and invisible enemies, this enthralling story makes more sense than ever.

    Request this item.

    Station Eleven

    April 26, 2017

    Station Eleven
    by Emily St. John Mandel
    An audacious, darkly glittering novel about art, fame, and ambition set in the eerie days of civilization’s collapse, from the author of three highly–acclaimed previous novels. One snowy night a famous Hollywood actor slumps over and dies onstage during a production of King Lear. Hours later, the world as we know it begins to dissolve. Moving back and forth in time— from the actor’s early days as a film star to fifteen years in the future, when a theater troupe known as the Traveling Symphony roams the wasteland of what remains—this suspenseful, elegiac, spellbinding novel charts the strange twists of fate that connect five people.

    Request this item.

    H is for Hawk

    May 31, 2017

    H is for Hawk
    by Helen Macdonald
    When Helen Macdonald’s father died suddenly on a London street, she was devastated. An experienced falconer, Helen had never before been tempted to train one of the most vicious predators, the goshawk, but in her grief, she saw that the goshawk’s fierce and feral temperament mirrored her own. Resolving to purchase and raise the deadly creature as a means to cope with her loss, she adopted Mabel, and turned to the guidance of The Once and Future King author T.H. White’s chronicle The Goshawk to begin her challenging endeavor. Projecting herself "in the hawk’s wild mind to tame her" tested the limits of Macdonald’s humanity and changed her life.

    Request this item.

    The Girl Who Wrote in Silk

    June 28, 2017

    The Girl Who Wrote in Silk
    by Kelly Estes
    The smallest items can hold centuries of secrets. Inara Erickson is exploring her deceased aunt’s island estate when she finds an elaborately stitched piece of fabric hidden in the house. As she peels back layer upon layer of the secrets it holds, Inara’s life becomes interwoven with that of Mei Lein, a young Chinese girl mysteriously driven from her home a century before. Through the stories Mei Lein tells in silk, Inara uncovers a tragic truth that will shake her family to its core—and force her to make an impossible choice. Inspired by true events, Kelli Estes’ brilliant and atmospheric debut serves as a poignant tale of two women determined to do the right thing, and the power of our own stories.

    Request this item.

    First Bite: How We Learn to Eat

    July 26, 2017

    First Bite: How We Learn to Eat
    by Bee Wilson
    What are the origins of taste? In First Bite, beloved food writer Bee Wilson draws from the latest research from food psychologists, neuroscientists, and nutritionists to reveal that our food habits are shaped by a whole host of factors, including family, culture, memory, gender, hunger, and love. An exploration of the extraordinary and surprising origins of our tastes and eating habit—from people who can only eat foods of a certain color to an amnesiac who can eat meal after meal without getting full. First Bite also shows us how we can change our palates to lead healthier, happier lives.

    Request this item.

    Homegoing

    August 30, 2017

    Homegoing
    by Yaa Gyasi
    Two half–sisters, Effia and Esi, unknown to each other, are born into two different tribal villages in 18th century Ghana. Effia will be married off to an English colonial, and will live in comfort in the sprawling, palatial rooms of Cape Coast Castle, raising half–caste children who will be sent abroad to be educated in England. Her sister, Esi, will be imprisoned beneath Effia in the Castle’s women’s dungeon, and then shipped off on a boat bound for America, where she will be sold into slavery. Stretching from the tribal wars of Ghana to slavery and Civil War in America, from the coal mines in the north to the Great Migration to the streets of 20th century Harlem, Gyasi's novel moves through histories and geographies and— with outstanding economy and force—captures the troubled spirit of our own nation.

    Request this item.

    Reading Lolita in Tehran

    September 27, 2017

    Reading Lolita in Tehran
    by Azar Nafisi
    For two years before she left Iran in 1997, Nafisi gathered seven young women at her house every Thursday morning to read and discuss forbidden works of Western literature. They were all former students whom she had taught at university. They were unaccustomed to being asked to speak their minds, but soon they began to open up and to speak more freely, not only about the novels they were reading but also about themselves, their dreams, and disappointments. Azar Nafisi’s tale offers us a rare glimpse, from the inside, of women’s lives in revolutionary Iran.

    Request this item.

    All The Light We Cannot See

    October 25, 2017

    All The Light We Cannot See
    by Anthony Doerr
    Marie Laure lives with her father in Paris within walking distance of the Museum of Natural History, where he works as the master of locks. When Marie is six, she goes blind, so her father builds a model of their neighborhood so she can memorize it with her fingers and navigate the real streets with her feet and cane. When the Germans occupy Paris, father and daughter flee to the Brittany coast, where Marie’s agoraphobic great uncle lives in a narrow house by the sea. In another world in Germany, an orphan boy, Werner, grows up enchanted by a crude radio. He becomes a master at building and fixing radios, a talent that wins him a place at an elite and brutal military academy and, ultimately, makes him a highly specialized tracker of the Resistance. Werner travels through the heart of Hitler Youth to the far–flung outskirts of Russia, and finally into Saint–Malo, where his path converges with Marie. Interweaving the lives of Marie and Werner, Doerr illuminates the ways, against all odds, people try to be good to one another.

    Request this item.

    Men Explain Things to Me

    November 29, 2017

    Men Explain Things to Me
    by Rebecca Solnit
    In her comic, scathing essay "Men Explain Things to Me", Rebecca Solnit took on what often goes wrong in conversations between men and women. She wrote about men who wrongly assume they know things and wrongly assume women don’t, about why this arises, and how this aspect of the gender wars works, airing some of her own hilariously awful encounters. She ends on a serious note: the ultimate problem is the silencing of women who have something to say, including those saying things like, "He's trying to kill me!" This book features that now–classic essay with six complements, including an examination of the great feminist writer Virginia Woolf’s embrace of mystery, of not knowing, of doubt and ambiguity, a highly original inquiry into marriage equality, and a terrifying survey of the scope of contemporary violence against women.

    Request this item.

    A Man Called Ove

    December 27, 2017

    A Man Called Ove
    by Fredrik Backman
    Meet Ove. He’s a curmudgeon—the kind of man who points at people he dislikes as if they were burglars caught outside his bedroom window. He has staunch principles, strict routines, and a short fuse. People call him "the bitter neighbor from hell". But behind the cranky exterior there is a story and a sadness. So when one November morning a chatty young couple with two chatty young daughters move in next door and accidentally flatten Ove’s mailbox, it is the lead–in to a comical and heartwarming tale of unkempt cats, unexpected friendship, and the ancient art of backing up a U–Haul.

    Request this item.


Second Tuesday Book Discussion Group @ Port Angeles Main Library

2nd Tuesday Book Discussion Group

The Second Tuesday Book Discussion Group reads both fiction and nonfiction titles, and meets at 11am on the second Tuesday of every month. Attend as often as you wish. Drop-ins are always welcome. Copies of each month's selection may be available for check out on a first-come first-served basis.

The Second Tuesday Book Discussion Group is generously supported by the Port Angeles Friends of the Library.

Current Book Selection

All the Light We Cannot See

All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr
Tuesday, March 14, 11am

Marie Laure lives with her father in Paris, within walking distance of the Museum of Natural History where he works as the master of the locks. When Marie is blinded at the age of six, her father builds a model of their neighborhood–every house, every manhole–so she can memorize it with her fingers and navigate the real streets with her feet and cane. When the Germans occupy Paris, father and daughter flee to Saint–Malo on the Brittany coast, where Marie–Laure’s agoraphobic great uncle lives in a tall, narrow house by the sea wall. In another world in Germany, an orphan boy, Werner, grows up with his younger sister, Jutta, both enchanted by a crude radio Werner finds. He becomes a master at building and fixing radios, a talent that wins him a place at an elite and brutal military academy and, ultimately, makes him a highly specialized tracker of the Resistance. Werner travels through the heart of Hitler Youth to the far–flung outskirts of Russia, and finally into Saint–Malo, where his path converges with Marie–Laure. Interweaving the lives of Marie–Laure and Werner, Doerr illuminates the ways, against all odds, people try to be good to one another.

Copies of this book are available at the Library. Request a copy here.

  • 2nd Tuesday Book Selection List

  • Cutting For Stone

    January 10, 2017

    Cutting For Stone
    by Abraham Verghese
    Marion, fresh out of medical school, flees Ethiopia and makes his way to America, finding refuge in his work as an intern at an underfunded, overcrowded New York City hospital. When the past catches up to him, Marion must entrust his life to the two men he thought he trusted least in the world: the surgeon father who abandoned him and the brother who betrayed him.

    Request this item.

    The Storied Life of AJ Fikry

    February 14, 2017

    The Storied Life of AJ Fikry
    by Gabrielle Zevin
    When his most prized possession, a rare collection of Poe poems, is stolen, bookstore owner A. J. Fikry begins isolating himself from his friends, family and associates before receiving a mysterious package that compels him to remake his life.

    Request this item.

    All the Light We Cannot See

    March 14, 2017

    All the Light We Cannot See
    by Anthony Doerr
    Marie Laure lives with her father in Paris, within walking distance of the Museum of Natural History where he works as the master of the locks. When Marie is blinded at the age of six, her father builds a model of their neighborhood–every house, every manhole–so she can memorize it with her fingers and navigate the real streets with her feet and cane. When the Germans occupy Paris, father and daughter flee to Saint–Malo on the Brittany coast, where Marie–Laure’s agoraphobic great uncle lives in a tall, narrow house by the sea wall. In another world in Germany, an orphan boy, Werner, grows up with his younger sister, Jutta, both enchanted by a crude radio Werner finds. He becomes a master at building and fixing radios, a talent that wins him a place at an elite and brutal military academy and, ultimately, makes him a highly specialized tracker of the Resistance. Werner travels through the heart of Hitler Youth to the far–flung outskirts of Russia, and finally into Saint–Malo, where his path converges with Marie–Laure. Interweaving the lives of Marie–Laure and Werner, Doerr illuminates the ways, against all odds, people try to be good to one another.

    Request this item.

    : Being Mortal

    April 11, 2017

    Being Mortal
    by Atul Gwande
    Atul Gawande tackles the hardest challenge of his profession: how medicine can not only improve life but also the process of its ending. Full of eye-opening research and riveting storytelling, Gawande asserts that medicine can comfort and enhance our experience even to the end, providing not only a good life but also a good end.

    Request this item.

    Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children

    May 9, 2017

    Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children
    by Ransom Riggs
    A horrific family tragedy sets sixteen–year–old Jacob on a journey to a remote island off the coast of Wales, where he discovers the crumbling ruins of Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children. As Jacob explores its abandoned bedrooms and hallways, it becomes clear that the children were more than just peculiar. They may have been dangerous. They may have been quarantined on a deserted island for good reason. And somehow–– impossible though it seems–– they may still be alive.

    Request this item.

    The Garden of Evening Mists

    June 13, 2017

    The Garden of Evening Mists
    by Twan Eng Tan
    Malaya, 1951. Yun Ling Teoh, the scarred lone survivor of a brutal Japanese wartime camp, seeks solace among the jungle–fringed tea plantations of Cameron Highlands. There she discovers Yugiri, the only Japanese garden in Malaya, and its owner and creator, the enigmatic Aritomo, exiled former gardener of the emperor of Japan. Despite her hatred of the Japanese, Yun Ling seeks to engage Aritomo to create a garden in memory of her sister, who died in the camp. Aritomo refuses but agrees to accept Yun Ling as his apprentice “until the monsoon comes." Then she can design a garden for herself. As the months pass, Yun Ling finds herself intimately drawn to the gardener and his art, while all around them a communist guerilla war rages. But the Garden of Evening Mists remains a place of mystery. Who is Aritomo and how did he come to leave Japan? And is the real story of how Yun Ling managed to survive the war perhaps the darkest secret of all?

    Request this item.

    If Today Be Sweet

    July 11, 2017

    If Today Be Sweet
    by Thrity Umriger
    The recent death of her beloved husband, Rustom, has taken its toll on Tehmina Sethna. Now, while visiting her son, Sorab, in his suburban Ohio home, she is being asked to choose between continuing her old life in India and starting a new one in this unfamiliar country with her son, his American wife, and their child. Her destiny is uncertain, and soon the plight of two troubled young children next door will force the most difficult decision she has ever faced. Ultimately the journey is one that Tehmina must travel alone.

    Request this item.

    When Breath Becomes Air

    August 8, 2017

    When Breath Becomes Air
    by Paul Kalanithi
    At the age of thirty–six, on the verge of completing a decade’s worth of training as a neurosurgeon, Paul Kalanithi was diagnosed with stage IV lung cancer. One day he was a doctor making a living treating the dying, and the next he was a patient struggling to live. Just like that, the future he and his wife had imagined evaporated. When Breath Becomes Air, featuring a foreword by Dr. Abraham Verghese and an epilogue by Kalanithi's wife, Lucy, chronicles Kalanithi’s transformation from a naíve medical student ’possessed,’ as he wrote, ’by the question of what, given that all organisms die, makes a virtuous and meaningful life’ into a young neurosurgeon at Stanford, guiding patients toward a deeper understanding of death and illness, and finally into a patient and a new father to a baby girl, confronting his own mortality.

    Request this item.

    The Goldfinch

    September 12, 2017

    The Goldfinch
    by Donna Tartt
    A young boy in New York City, Theo Decker, miraculously survives an accident that takes the life of his mother. Alone and abandoned by his father, Theo is taken in by a friend’s family and struggles to make sense of his new life. In the years that follow, he becomes entranced by one of the few things that reminds him of his mother: a small, mysteriously captivating painting that ultimately draws Theo into the art underworld. Composed with the skills of a master, The Goldfinch is a haunted odyssey through present–day America, and a drama of almost unbearable acuity and power. It is a story of loss and obsession, survival and self–invention, and the enormous power of art.

    Request this item.

    Dinner With Edward

    October 10, 2017

    Dinner With Edward
    by Isabel Vincent
    When Isabel meets Edward, both are at a crossroads: he wants to follow his late wife to the grave, and she is ready to give up on love. Thinking she is merely helping out a friend–Edward’s daughter–Isabel has no idea that the man in the kitchen baking the sublime roast chicken and light–as–air apricot soufflé will end up changing her life. As Edward and Isabel meet weekly for the glorious dinners that Edward prepares, he shares so much more than his recipes for apple galette or the perfect martini: he teaches Isabel the luxury of slowing down and taking the time to think through everything she does, to deconstruct her own life, to cut back to the bone and examine the guts, no matter how messy that proves to be.

    Request this item.

    Shoe dog : a memoir by the creator of Nike

    November 14, 2017

    Shoe dog : a memoir by the creator of Nike
    by Philip Knight
    For the first time ever, Nike founder and CEO Phil Knight shares the inside story of the company’s early days as an intrepid start–up and its evolution into one of the world’s most iconic, game–changing, and profitable brands. In 1962, fresh out of business school, Phil Knight borrowed $50 from his father and created a company with a simple mission: import high–quality, low–cost athletic shoes from Japan. Selling the shoes from the trunk of his lime green Plymouth Valiant, Knight grossed $8,000 his first year. Today, Nike's annual sales top $30 billion.

    Request this item.

    The Years of Rice and Salt

    December 12, 2017

    The Years of Rice and Salt
    by Kim Stanley Robinson
    It is the fourteenth century and one of the most apocalyptic events in human history is set to occur: the coming of the Black Death. History teaches us that a third of Europe’s population was destroyed. But what if the plague had killed 99 percent of the population instead? How would the world have changed? This is a look at the history that could have been—a history that stretches across centuries, a history that sees dynasties and nations rise and crumble, a history that spans horrible famine and magnificent innovation. These are the years of rice and salt. Through the eyes of soldiers and kings, explorers and philosophers, slaves and scholars, Robinson renders an immensely rich tapestry. From the steppes of Asia to the shores of the Western Hemisphere, from the age of Akbar to the present and beyond, here is the stunning story of the creation of a new world.

    Request this item.


Page2Screen Book and Film Discussion Group @ Port Angeles Main Library

Page2Screen Book Discussion Group

The Page2Screen book-to-film discussion group explores good reads and the films inspired by them. The group meets at 6:30pm on the last Tuesday of every month in the Coffey Room at the Port Angeles Main Library. Optional film screenings will be offered before each meeting.

Attend as often as you wish. Drop-ins are always welcome.
Copies of each month’s selections may be available for checkout on a first-come, first-served basis.

Please note: There will be no meetings in June, July, or December.
This book discussion group is generously supported by the Port Angeles Friends of the Library.

Current Book and DVD Selection

Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children

Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children by Ransom Riggs
Tuesday, February 28
-- film screening, 4pm
-- book discussion, 6:30pm

A horrific family tragedy sets sixteen−year−old Jacob on a journey to a remote island off the coast of Wales, where he discovers the crumbling ruins of Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children. As Jacob explores its abandoned bedrooms and hallways, it becomes clear that the children were more than just peculiar.

Copies of the book and DVD are available at the library. Request a copy here.

  • Page2Screen Book Selection List
  • The Danish Girl

    January 31, 2017

    The Danish Girl
    by David Ebershoff
    -- film screening, 4pm
    -- book discussion, 6:30pm

    Loosely inspired by a true story, this tender portrait of marriage asks: What do you do when the person you love has to change? Uniting fact and fiction into an original romantic vision, “The Danish Girl" eloquently portrays the unique intimacy that defines every marriage and the remarkable story of Lili Elbe, a pioneer in transgender history, and the woman torn between loyalty to her marriage and her own ambitions and desires. A deeply moving first novel about one of the most passionate and unusual love stories of the 20th century.

    Request this item.

    Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children

    February 28, 2017

    Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children
    by Ransom Riggs
    -- film screening, 4pm
    -- book discussion, 6:30pm

    A horrific family tragedy sets sixteen–year–old Jacob on a journey to a remote island off the coast of Wales, where he discovers the crumbling ruins of Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children. As Jacob explores its abandoned bedrooms and hallways, it becomes clear that the children were more than just peculiar.

    Request this item.

    The Light Between Oceans

    March 28, 2017

    The Light Between Oceans
    by M.L. Stedman
    -- film screening, 4pm
    -- book discussion, 6:30pm

    After the horror of World War I, Tom Sherbourne welcomes his new job as the lighthouse keeper on Janus Rock, an isolated island with no residents aside from him and his wife Isabel. But times on the island are tough for Isabel as she suffers multiple miscarriages and a stillbirth in just four years’ time. When a boat with a dead man and a young baby washes ashore, Isabel convinces Tom to let her keep the baby as their own, but the consequences to her actions may be dire.

    Request this item.

    The Revenant

    April 25, 2017

    The Revenant
    by Michael Punke
    -- film screening, 3:30pm
    -- book discussion, 6:30pm

    A fictional account of a real-life story of survival on the American frontier, chronicling the adventures and exploits of fur trapper Hugh Glass, who is attacked by a grizzly bear and abandoned by his fellow trappers. Left alone and defenseless, Glass manages to survive and trek thousands of miles through the wilderness to seek justice.

    Request this item.

    The Girl on the Train

    May 30, 2017

    The Girl on the Train
    by Paula Hawkins
    -- film screening, 4pm
    -- book discussion, 6:30pm

    Rachel takes the same commuter train every morning. Every day she rattles down the track, flashes past a stretch of cozy suburban homes, and stops at the signal that allows her to daily watch the same couple breakfasting on their deck. Their life–as she sees it–is perfect. Not unlike the life she recently lost. And then she sees something shocking. It's only a minute until the train moves on, but it's enough. Unable to keep it to herself, Rachel offers what she knows to the police, and becomes inextricably entwined in what happens next, as well as in the lives of everyone involved.

    Request this item.

    June: No Meeting

    July: No Meeting

    Me Before You

    August 29, 2017

    Me Before You
    by JoJo Moyes
    -- film screening, 4pm
    -- book discussion, 6:30pm

    Louisa Clark is an ordinary girl living an exceedingly ordinary life—steady boyfriend, close family—who has never been farther afield than her tiny village. She takes a badly–needed job working for ex–Master of the Universe Will Traynor, now wheelchair–bound after a motorcycle accident. Will has always lived a huge life—big deals, extreme sports, world travel— and is acerbic, moody, and bossy. But Lou refuses to treat him with kid gloves, and soon his happiness means more to her than she expected. When she learns that Will has shocking plans of his own, she sets out to show him that life is still worth living.

    Request this item.

    Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk

    September 26, 2017

    Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk
    by Ben Fountain
    -- film screening, 4pm
    -- book discussion, 6:30pm

    This razor–sharp satire is set in Texas during America's war in Iraq. It explores the gaping national disconnect between the war at home and the war abroad. Ben Fountain’s remarkable debut novel follows the surviving members of the heroic Bravo Squad through one exhausting stop in their media–intensive “Victory Tour" at Texas Stadium, football mecca of the Dallas Cowboys, their fans, promoters, and cheerleaders.

    Request this item.

    The Queen of Katwe

    October 31, 2017

    The Queen of Katwe
    by Tim Crothers
    -- film screening, 4pm
    -- book discussion, 6:30pm

    One day in 2005 while searching for food, nine-year-old Ugandan Phiona Mutesi followed her brother to a dusty veranda where she met Robert Katende. Katende, a war refugee turned missionary, had an improbable dream: to empower kids in the Katwe slum through chess–a game so foreign there is no word for it in their native language. Laying a chess­board in the dirt, Robert began to teach. At first children came for a free bowl of porridge, but many grew to love the game that–like their daily lives–requires persevering against great obstacles. Of these kids, one girl stood out as an immense talent: Phiona. By the age of eleven Phiona was her country’s junior champion, and at fifteen, the national champion. Now a Woman Candidate Master–the first female titled player in her country’s history–Phiona dreams of becoming a Grandmaster, the most elite level in chess. But to reach that goal, she must grapple with everyday life in one of the world’s most unstable countries.

    Request this item.

    The Circle

    November 28, 2017

    The Circle
    by Dave Eggers
    -- film screening, 4pm
    -- book discussion, 6:30pm

    When Mae Holland is hired to work for the Circle, the world’s most powerful internet company, she feels she’s been given the opportunity of a lifetime. Mae can't believe her luck, her great fortune to work for the most influential company in the world–even as life beyond the campus grows distant, even as a strange encounter with a colleague leaves her shaken, even as her role at the Circle becomes increasingly public. What begins as the captivating story of one woman’s ambition and idealism soon becomes a heart–racing novel of suspense, raising questions about memory, history, privacy, democracy, and the limits of human knowledge.

    Request this item.

    December: No Meeting


Novel Conversations Book Discussion Group @ Sequim Branch Library

Novel Conversation Book Discussion Group

Novel Conversations is a new monthly book discussion group fostering dialogue around works of fiction and non-fiction, exploring world literature in a round table setting. All are welcome to drop in and participate. Copies of each month’s selection are available for checkout at the previous month’s meeting.

The Novel Conversations Book Discussion Group will meet at 4pm on the fourth Wednesday of each month in the Sequim Branch Library meeting room. Participation is free, and no registration is required.


Current Book Selection

Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet

Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet by Jamie Ford
Wednesday, March 22, 4pm

When artifacts from Japanese families sent to internment camps during World War II are uncovered during renovations at a Seattle hotel, a man embarks on a quest that leads to memories of growing up Chinese in a city rife with anti–Japanese sentiment.

Copies of this book are available. Request a copy here.


  • Novel Conversations Book Selection List
  • The Whistling Season

    January 25, 2017

    The Whistling Season
    by Ivan Doig
    In 1909, struggling to farm his remote homestead and raise three sons, widower Oliver Milliron desperately needs help. A housekeeper’s ad in a Milwaukee newspaper, "Can't cook but doesn't bite", leads him to hire her sight unseen. When perky Rose Llewellyn arrives, she brings her brainy brother, Morris. Though Rose whistles through her work at the Milliron house, and Morris becomes teacher at the one–room school, these two newcomers conceal a past that is colorful and infamous.

    Request this item.

    If the Oceans Were Ink: An Unlikely Friendship and a Journey to the Heart of the Qurʼan

    February 22, 2017

    If the Oceans Were Ink: An Unlikely Friendship and a Journey to the Heart of the Qur’an
    by Carla Power
    The eye–opening story of how American Carla Powers and her longtime friend Sheikh Mohammad Akram Nadwi found a way to confront ugly stereotypes and persistent misperceptions that were cleaving their communities.

    Request this item.

    Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet

    March 22, 2017

    Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet
    by Jamie Ford
    When artifacts from Japanese families sent to internment camps during World War II are uncovered during renovations at a Seattle hotel, a man embarks on a quest that leads to memories of growing up Chinese in a city rife with anti–Japanese sentiment.

    Request this item.


2nd Saturday Book Discussion Group @ Sequim Branch Library

Sequim Book Discussion Group

“A great book should leave you with many experiences... You live several lives while reading.” (William Styron, Conversations with William Styron). The Sequim Book Discussion Group brings great, fiction and non-fiction and classic and contemporary books to life, exploring those shared lives together in a round table setting.

The group is free and open to the public. No reservations are needed. Attend as often as you wish.

Copies of each month’s selection are available to check out at the previous month’s meeting.

Discussions take place the second Saturday of every month at 3pm.


Current Book Selection

The Martian

The Martian by Andy Weir
Saturday, March 11, 3pm

Mark Whitney was nearly killed by a dust storm on Mars and then abandoned by his crew that thought him dead. Now he’s all alone with no way of letting Earth know he’s alive, which doesn’t matter because his supplies would run out before they’d get there. Either way, the environment or human error will likely kill him first. Not giving in, Mark works to survive, battling obstacle after obstacle, but will it be enough?

Copies of this book are available in regular print, large print, audio book on CD,
and downloadable e-book.
Request a copy here.

  • 2nd Saturday Book Selection List
  • Tracks

    January 14, 2017

    Tracks
    by Robyn Davidson
    Tracks tells the remarkable true story of Robyn Davidson, a young woman who leaves her life in the city to make a solo trek across almost 2,000 miles of sprawling Australian desert. Accompanied only by her dog and four unpredictable camels, she sets off on a life–changing journey of self–discovery. Along the way, she meets National Geographic photographer Rick Smolan, who begins to chronicle her voyage.

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    Euphoria

    February 11, 2017

    Euphoria
    by Lily King
    A breathtaking novel about three young anthropologists in the ’30s who are caught in a passionate love triangle that threatens their bonds, careers, and ultimately, their lives. English anthropologist Andrew Bankson has been alone in the field for several years, studying the Kiona River tribe in New Guinea, when he meets renowned anthropologist Nell Stone and her fiery husband Fen at a party. Before long, Andrew becomes obsessed—not just with his work but with Nell, and the relationship tangle sets off a fateful series of events.

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    The Martian

    March 11, 2017

    The Martian
    by Andy Weir
    Mark Whitney was nearly killed by a dust storm on Mars and then abandoned by his crew that thought him dead. Now he’s all alone with no way of letting Earth know he’s alive, which doesn’t matter because his supplies would run out before they’d get there. Either way, the environment or human error will likely kill him first. Not giving in, Mark works to survive, battling obstacle after obstacle, but will it be enough?

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    The Painter

    April 8, 2017

    The Painter
    by Peter Heller
    Jim Stegner has seen his share of violence and loss. Years ago he shot a man in a bar. His marriage disintegrated. He grieved the one thing he loved. In the wake of tragedy, Jim, spends his days painting and fly–fishing, trying to find a way to live with the dark impulses that sometimes overtake him. But one afternoon, on a dirt road, Jim comes across a man beating a small horse, and a brutal encounter rips his quiet life wide open.

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    Twelve Years a Slave

    May 13, 2017

    Twelve Years a Slave
    by Solomon Northup
    This is the harrowing account of a black man, born free in New York State, who was drugged, kidnapped, and sold into slavery in 1841. Having no way to contact his family, and fearing for his life if he told the truth, Solomon Northup was sold from plantation to plantation in Louisiana, toiling under cruel masters for twelve years before meeting Samuel Bass, a Canadian who finally put him in touch with his family, and helped start the process to regain his freedom.

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    Delta Wedding

    June 10, 2017

    Delta Wedding
    by Eudora Welty
    A vivid and charming portrait of a large southern family, the Fairchilds, who live on a plantation in the Mississippi delta. The story, set in 1923, is exquisitely woven from the ordinary events of family life, centered around the visit of a young relative, Laura McRaven, and the family’s preparations for her cousin Dabney’s wedding.

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    The Cleaner of Chartres

    July 8, 2017

    The Cleaner of Chartres
    by Salley Vickers
    Working as a cleaner in the cathedral of Chartres for more than twenty years, Agnès Morel profoundly transforms local lives by performing small tasks and using her subtle influence when an accidental encounter reveals tragic incidents from her youth.

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    In the Heart of the Sea

    August 12, 2017

    In the Heart of the Sea
    by Nathaniel Philbrick
    The incredible story of the wreck of the whaleship Essex, the inspiration for Melville’s great classic, Moby Dick. In 1820, the Essex set sail from Nantucket on a routine voyage for whales. Fifteen months later, in the farthest reaches of the South Pacific, it was rammed and sunk by an 80–ton bull sperm whale. Its 20–man crew, fearing cannibals on the islands to the west, made for the 3,000–mile–distant coast of South America in three tiny boats.

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    The Septembers of Shiraz

    September 9, 2017

    The Septembers of Shiraz
    by Dalia Sofer
    In this debut novel, Isaac Amin, a Jewish businessman in Tehran, is imprisoned following the Iranian Revolution. As Amin attempts to survive his brutal treatment and convince his captors that he is not a Zionist spy, his wife, young daughter, and son (a college student in New York City) find various ways to cope with the radical change in their way of life and the knowledge that they may never see Amin again.

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    The Witches: Salem, 1692

    October 14, 2017

    The Witches: Salem, 1692
    by Stacy Schiff
    A seminal episode and primal American mystery is unveiled in crackling detail and lyrical prose by one of our most acclaimed historians. Schiff brings the textures and tensions of colonial life into devastating clarity, and brilliantly aligns early American anxieties with our own. In an era of religious provocations, crowdsourcing, and invisible enemies, this enthralling story makes more sense than ever.

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    The Hearts of Horses

    November 18, 2017 (3rd Saturday meeting in observance of Veteran’s Day)

    The Hearts of Horses
    by Molly Gloss
    In the winter of 1917, nineteen–year–old Martha Lessen heads for a remote county in eastern Oregon, looking for work gentling wild horses. She chances on a rancher, George Bliss, who is willing to hire her on. While many of his regular hands are off fighting the war, he glimpses, beneath Martha’s showy rodeo garb, a shy but strong–willed girl with a serious knowledge of horses. A heartwarming, greatly satisfying story about the unexpected and profound connections between people and animals.

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    All the Light We Cannot See

    December 9, 2017

    All the Light We Cannot See
    by Anthony Doerr
    Marie Laure lives with her father in Paris and is blind by age six. Her father builds her a model of their neighborhood, so she can memorize it and navigate the real streets. When the Germans occupy Paris, they flee to Saint–Malo on the coast. Meanwhile, in Germany, Werner grows up enchanted by a crude radio he finds. He becomes a master at building and fixing radios, which wins him a place with the Hitler Youth. Werner travels throughout Europe, and finally to Saint–Malo, where his and Marie Laure’s stories intertwine.

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